12 Things You Don't Know Are Fading Your Hair Color – NewBeauty

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Another no-no for colored hair: purple, blue,
silver or red shampoos. “Be careful of pigmented shampoos,” warns Clint Dunlap,
colorist at Marie Robinson Salon. “Overuse of these shampoos can build up on porous
ends and cause any hair color to dull—and quickly. “Human hair is one of the most absorbent materials around,” says Andrew Carruthers, director of education for Sam Villa, who says you should think about a dry sponge versus a wet sponge when it comes to soaking your hair. “When that dry sponge is submerged into chlorine-filled water, how much more of that chlorine will it absorb versus a sponge that has already been saturated with clean water? ” But that’s not to say those of us with colored hair can’t go swimming. “Chlorine should be removed from hair before it dries,” adds Carruthers, explaining that once hair is dry, the chlorine bonds to the hair and it very difficult to remove. “If possible, hair should be rinsed with clean water before the chlorine water has a chance to dry. “Even
if you are using the perfect shampoo for your hair type, water is a big contributor to fading,” explains Cave,
adding that when washing your hair, the cooler the water temperature the better.

Another secret color-fading culprit: chlorine you didn’t know was in your water. “Every now and then, I see a client who
has a green hue to their hair due to the chlorine in their water,” says celebrity hair colorist Ashley Wahler. “Investing in
a shower head filter is a quick fix to that problem as well as keeping your
color bright and hair shiny,” she says. “If you have a sunroof
or are constantly outside, be sure to wear a hat,” stresses Wahler, adding that
the sun can not only fade color, but it exposes the natural remaining pigments,
which are usually the brassy and unwanted tones. “The sun produces harmful
UVA/UVB rays, which can also burn the hair,” adds Jim Markham, celebrity stylist and founder of ColorProof.

Celebrity hairstylist Ricardo Rojas says that after your hair has been exposed to the sun and/or chlorine, it’s crucial to nourish it at it’s most fragile state. “I like to do a nourishing jasmine or coconut hair mask every three weeks for my clients during the summer months. ” If you don’t have enough time to dedicate to a mask, reach for Sachajuan’s Intensive Hair Oil ($50), formulated with argan and sea buckthorn oil, for the same effect minus the time commitment (apply it to damp or dry hair and style as usual). “When considering which hues to dye your hair, maybe
reconsider red,” advises Cave, explaining that while it’s glamorous, if it’s
not your natural tone, the artificial red pigments tend to leave strands the
fastest.

Chan explains that outdoor activities will fade hair color
just like heat styling will, so creating a custom leave-in treatment to seal
cuticles to lock in hair color before spending the day outdoors or styling is
your best bet. “Mix 2 ounces of lemon juice, ½ teaspoon of coconut oil and 0. 25
ounces of your favorite conditioner,” he says, adding that we should apply this
treatment on hair before and after we go in the sun, and before we start heat
styling to keep color intact.

Markham says that heat protection is an absolute must if you’re using hot tools. “Heat
styling can fry the cuticle, leaving hair frazzled, dry, damaged and broken
over time. ” Be sure to reach for a heat protectant every time you style to keep
your color from fading and your hues looking bright.

Carruthers warns
that excessive heat, which usually comes from styling, can destroy the
molecules in hair color. “Color fading increased dramatically as the industry
introduced higher heat irons,” he says, adding that you should look for tools
that only reach a safe temperature for color-treated hair.

Maddison Cave, colorist at the Rita Hazan Salon, says
this is because the chemicals in hair color make our hair more vulnerable to
water. “Try washing your hair every other day or even every three days if you
don’t get oily,” she says, also recommending using dry shampoo in between washes to keep it feeling clean.

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